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The IBR is a publication of the Indiana Business Research Center at IU's Kelley School of Business

Long Form Data Fill Out Census 2000 Portrait

Indiana Business Research Center, Kelley School of Business, Indiana University

In four small clusters of townships throughout the state, at least one in five households has no telephone service. These areas are largely populated by Amish families (see Figure 1).

Figure 1
Households with No Telephone Service

Figure 1

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Several suburban townships ringing Indianapolis experienced strong residential construction activity from 1995 to 2000, with 20 percent or more of the housing stock built in that period (see Figure 2).

Figure 2
Percent of Housing Units Built 1995 or Later

Figure 2

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In an odd mix of townships, at least one in 10 households had no vehicles available. In Amish communities, college towns, and urbanized townships in Evansville, Indianapolis, and northern Lake County, 10 percent of households rely on other modes of transportation (see Figure 3).

Figure 3
Percent of Households with No Vehicles Available

Figure 3

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In six of nine Marion County townships, as well as some suburban areas and university communities, at least 25 percent of household heads had moved within five quarters of Census Day (April 1, 2000) (see Figure 4).

Figure 4
Percent of Householders Moved into Unit 1999 or Later

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